Peter Zaitsev‘Open Source Appreciation Day’ draws OpenStack, MySQL and CentOS faithful (16.4.2014, 10:00 UTC)
Open Source Appreciation Day Brings Together OpenStack, MySQL, and CentOS Communities

210 people registered for the inaugural “Open Source Appreciation Day” March 31 in Santa Clara, Calif. The event will be held each year at Percona Live henceforth.

To kick off the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2014, Percona held the first “Open Source Appreciation Day” on Monday, March 31st. Over 210 people registered and the day’s two free events focused on CentOS and OpenStack.

The OpenStack Today event brought together members of the OpenStack community and MySQL experts in an afternoon of talks and sharing of best practices for both technologies. After a brief welcome message from Peter Zaitsev, co-founder and CEO of Percona, Florian Haas shared an introduction to OpenStack including its history and the basics of how it works.

Jay Pipes delivered lessons from the field based on his years of OpenStack experience at AT&T, at Mirantis, and as a frequent code contributor to the project. Jay Janssen, a Percona managing consultant, complemented Jay Pipes’ talk with a MySQL expert’s perspective of OpenStack. He also shared ways to achieve High Availability using the latest version of Galera (Galera 3) and other new features found in the open source Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.

Amrith Kumar’s presentation focused on the latest happenings in project Trove, OpenStack’s evolving DBaaS component, and Tesora’s growing involvement. Amrith also won quote of the day for his response to a question about the difference between “elastic” and “scalable.” Amrith: “The waistband on my trousers is elastic. It is not scalable.” Sandro Mazziotta wrapped up the event by sharing the challenges and opportunities of OpenStack from both an integrator as well as operator point of view based on the customer experiences of eNovance.

OpenStack Today was made possible with the support of our sponsors, Tesora and hastexo. Here are links to presentations from the OpenStack Today event. Any missing presentations will soon be added to the OpenStack Today event page.

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Peter Zaitsevpercona-millipede – Sub-second replication monitor (15.4.2014, 13:00 UTC)

I recently helped a client implement a custom replication delay monitor and wanted to share the experience and discuss some of the iterations and decisions that were made. percona-millipede was developed in conjunction with Vimeo with the following high-level goal in mind: implement a millisecond level replication delay monitor and graph the results.  Please visit http://making.vimeo.com for more information and thanks to Vimeo for sharing this tool!

Here is the rough list of iterations we worked through in developing this tool/process:

  1. Standard pt-heartbeat update/monitor
  2. Asynchronous, threaded update/monitor tool
  3. Synchronized (via zeroMQ), threaded version of the tool

pt-heartbeat

Initially, we had been running pt-heartbeat (with default interval of 1.0) to monitor real replication delay.  This was fine for general alerting, but didn’t allow us to gain deeper insight into the running slaves.  Even when pt-heartbeat says it is “0 seconds behind”, that can actually mean the slave is up to .99 seconds behind (which in SQL time, can be a lot).  Given the sensitivity to replication delay and the high end infrastructure in place (Percona Server 5.6, 384G RAM, Virident and FusionIO PCI-Flash cards), we decided it was important to absorb the extra traffic in an effort gain further insight into the precise points of any slave lag.

There had been discussion about tweaking the use of pt-heartbeat (–interval = .01 with reduced skew) to look at the sub-second delay, but there were some other considerations:

  • The tool needed to update/monitor multiple hosts from a single process (i.e. we didn’t want multiple pt-heartbeat processes to track)
  • Native integration with existing statsd/graphite system

We likely could’ve achieved the above using pt-heartbeat, but it would’ve required a custom wrapper application to handle the other pieces (threads/subprocesses/inter-process communication).  As the main gist of pt-heartbeat is fairly straightforward (select ts from heartbeat table, calculate delay), it was decided to mimic that logic in a custom application that was configurable and met the other goals.

First Iteration – Async update/monitor

The first iteration was to spin up several threads within a main process (I chose Python for this, but it could be anything really) and set each in a loop with a set delay (.01 seconds for example).  One thread sends update statements with a timestamp, the other threads simply select that timestamp and calculate how long ago the row was updated (i.e. current time – row timestamp):

Async-Monitor

This iteration was better (we could see replication delay of 1-999 ms and isolate some sub-optimal processes), but there was still some concern.  When testing the solution, we noticed that when pointing the monitor against a single box (for both the update and select), we were still seeing replication delay.  After some discussion, it became apparent that using the current CPU time as the baseline was introducing time to calculate the delay as part of the delay.  Further, since these threads weren’t synchronized, there was no way to determine how long after the update statement the select was even run.

Final Iteration – ZeroMQ update/monitor

Based on this analysis, we opted to tweak the process and use a broadcast model to keep the monitor threads in sync.  For this, I chose to use ZeroMQ for the following reasons:

  • Built in PUB/SUB model with filtering – allows for grouping masters with slaves
  • Flexibility in terms of synchronization (across threads, processes, or servers – just a config tweak to the sockets)

After the update, here was the final architecture:

zeromq-Monitor

In this model, the update thread publishes the timestamp that was set on the master and each monitor thread simply waits as a consumer and then checks the timestamp on the slave vs the published timestamp.  Synchronization is built in using this model and we saw much more accurate results.  As opposed to sitting at 5-10ms all the time with spikes up to 50ms, w

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SkySQL TeamSQL or NoSQL? … Both with MariaDB 10 (14.4.2014, 21:52 UTC) Link
SkySQL TeamMySQL/MariaDB autoconf macros (14.4.2014, 21:17 UTC)

I've had my own set of autotool macros for building against different MySQL client and server APIs for quite a while. Originally created as part of my code generator projects (CodeGen_MySQL_UDF and CodeGen_MySQL_Plugin) I ended up having diverging copies in a few other projects, too (my and my autotools branch of ).

So I've finally taken the time to merge the differnet copies into a single standalone project on GitHUB.

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Peter ZaitsevAdvisory on Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) for Percona’s customers and users (14.4.2014, 15:03 UTC)

Over the last few days, the Percona team has spent a lot of time evaluating the impact of the Heartbleed bug (CVE-2014-0160) for our customers and for the users of our software. We published a formal disclosure a few days ago. However, I thought a quick summary and some additional information would be good to provide for our MySQL Performance Blog readers.

First, I want to point out that “Heartbleed” is an issue in a commonly used third-party library which typically comes with your operating system, so there is a lot of software which is impacted. An openly exposed service, which is typically a website or some form of API, can potentially cause the biggest impact for anyone. Even though we talk a lot about MySQL Server (and its variants), it will not be the primary concern for organizations following best practices and not exposing their MySQL server to the open Internet.

Second, if you take care of patching your operating system, this will take care of Percona Server, MariaDB or MySQL Server (see note below) as well as other software which uses the OpenSSL library as long as it is linked dynamically. It is highly recommended to dynamically link OpenSSL exactly to take care of such security issues with a single library update and not wait for separate security updates for multiple software packages. Note that updating the library is not enough – you need to restart the service in order for the new library to be loaded. In most cases, I recommend a full system restart as the simplest way to guaranty that all processes using the library have been restarted.

Third, it is worth noting that not all MySQL variants have been impacted and not in all cases. Obviously, your MySQL Server is not impacted if you’re running an operating system which is not vulnerable. You will also not be vulnerable if the MySQL Server or variant you’re using uses yaSSL instead of OpenSSL. In addition, in many cases SSL support is disabled on the server side by default, which might not be the best thing from a security standpoint but can save us from this bug. Finally, in many configurations the SSL/TLS connection setup will take place after initial handshake which does not allow this vulnerability in all cases. I do not have hard numbers but I would guess no more than 10-20% of MySQL (and variants) installations would be vulnerable, even before you look at when they are exposed to the Internet.

To find out whenever MySQL is dynamically compiled with OpenSSL or yaSSL you can use this command:

[root@localhost vagrant]# ldd /usr/sbin/mysqld | grep ssl
        libssl.so.10 => /usr/lib64/libssl.so.10 (0x00007fb7f4cbc000

It will show “libssl” for server linked with OpenSSL dynamically and it will show no matches for server compiled with yaSSL

It is worth noting as Lenz Grimmer pointed out in a blog post comment that Heartbleed impacts not only vulnerable servers but vulnerable clients can be at risk as well if they connect to a compromised server which implements code specially targeting the clients. This means you want to make sure to update your client machines as well, especially if you’re connecting to a non-trusted MySQL Server.

But enough on Percona Software. There is an impact to Percona web systems as well. The majority of our systems have not been impacted directly because they were running an OpenSSL version which did not have the Heartbleed vulnerability. However, because of how our systems are integrated, there was a small probability that some customer accounts could be exposed through impacted services: https://rdba.percona.com and https://cloud.percona.com. We promptly patched these services last week, regenerated keys, and reset passwords for all accounts which had even a small chance of being impacted.

We believe our teams have acted quickly and appropriately to secure our systems and minimize the chance of information leaks. We will continue to monitor the situation closely and update you via our advisory document if there is any new information needing your attention.

The post Advisory on Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) for Percona’s customers and users appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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SkySQL TeamLooking forward to the Red Hat Summit next week. Will you be there? (11.4.2014, 21:10 UTC)


Trade show season is in full swing again for SkySQL: The MariaDB Company. Next week we will be attending the Red Hat Summit in San Francisco. This is the 10th year of this great event, but our first time as a sponsor.

If have not yet purchased your pass for the Red Hat Summit you can use discount code "CUSTSKYSQ9039" for an instant savings.

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SkySQL TeamOpenSSL Heartbleed Security Update (11.4.2014, 08:08 UTC)

As some of you may know, CVE-2014-0160 (“Heartbleed”) announced a vulnerability in certain versions of OpenSSL.

After the announcement on Monday 7th April 2014, the team began investigating the level of potential risk to our hosted systems and on-premise software.

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Colin CharlesKorean MySQL Power User Group (11.4.2014, 07:09 UTC)

If you are a MySQL power user in Korea, its well worth joining the Korean MySQL Power User Group. This is a group led by senior DBAs at many Korean companies. From what I gather, there is experience there using MySQL, MariaDB, Percona Server and Galera Cluster (many on various 5.5, some on 5.6, and quite a few testing 10.0). No one is using WebScaleSQL (yet?). The discussion group is rather active, and I’ve got a profile there (I get questions translated for me).

BBQ starters for tonight's DBA dinner in SeoulThis is just a natural evolution of the DBA Dinners that were held once every quarter. Organised by OSS Korea, and sometimes funded by SkySQL, people would eat & drink, while hearing a short message about updates in the MySQL world (usually by me, but we’ve had special guests like Werner Vogels, CTO Amazon; recently we’ve seen appearances by Monty, Patrik Sallner, Michael Carney where mostly all we do then is eat & drink).

So from meetups to getting information online, in a quick fashion. Much hunger for open source in Korea, very smart people working there on services feeding the population (where some even make it outside of the local market). The future of open source in Korea is definitely very bright.

Related posts:

  1. Book in Korean: Real MariaDB
  2. Change in Affiliation
  3. The MySQL Mugshot Group
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Colin CharlesAmazon EC2 Linux AMIs (10.4.2014, 15:12 UTC)

If you use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), you are always given choices of AMIs (by default; there are plenty of other AMIs available for your base-os): Amazon Linux AMI, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SUSE Enterprise Server and Ubuntu. In terms of cost, the Amazon Linux AMI is the cheapest, followed by SUSE then RHEL. 

I use EC2 a lot for testing, and recently had to pay a “RHEL tax” as I needed to run a RHEL environment. For most uses I’m sure you can be satisfied by the Amazon Linux AMI. The last numbers suggest Amazon Linux is #2 in terms of usage on EC2.

Anyway, recently Amazon Linux AMI came out with the 2014.03 release (see release notes). You can install MySQL 5.1.73 or MySQL 5.5.36 (the latter makes the most sense today) easily without additional repositories.

The most interesting part of the release notes though? When the 2014.09 release comes out, it would mark 3 years since they’ve gone GA with the Amazon Linux AMI. They are likely to remove MySQL 5.1 (its old and deprecated upstream). And:

We are considering switching from MySQL to MariaDB.

This should be interesting going forward. MariaDB in the EC2 AMI would be a welcome addition naturally. I do wonder if the choice will be offered in RDS too. I will be watching the forums closely

Related posts:

  1. A Storage Engine for Amazon S3
  2. Some MariaDB related news from the Red Hat front
  3. MariaDB & distributions update, Dec 2013
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Peter ZaitsevPercona Live MySQL Conference Highlights (10.4.2014, 11:59 UTC)

The Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014 was March 31st through April 4th in Santa Clara, California. I heard numerous positive comments from attendees and saw even more on social media. Our conference team lead by Kortney Runyan pulled together a smooth, enjoyable event which made it easy for attendees to focus on learning and networking. Some of the Percona Live MySQL Conference highlights from this year follow.

Percona Live MySQL Conference Highlights

A few stats for the conference this year versus last year:

  • Total registrations were up nearly 15%
  • Attendees represented 40 countries, up from 36 in 2013
  • 34 companies sponsored the conference this year, up from 33 last year
  • This year’s conference covered 5 days including the Open Source Appreciation Day, up from 4 days last year

The conference could not grow without the support of attendees and sponsors. It’s great to see continued growth in attendees which is driven in large part by the word of mouth endorsements of those who attended in previous years.

PLMCE14 Attendee Map

Keynotes & SiliconANGLE Interviews Video Recordings

The Percona Live MySQL Conference 2014 featured some great keynote presentations. I would like to thank our great keynote speakers who covered a wide variety of topics including MySQL 5.7, integrating MySQL and Hadoop, SSD storage, OpenStack, and the future of running MySQL at scale. If you couldn’t attend this year, you can watch the keynote recordings by visiting the conference website. I was particularly interested in the presentation on MySQL 5.7 from Tomas Ulin, VP of MySQL Engineering for Oracle, which demonstrated the ongoing improvements and commitment Oracle has made to MySQL. I also found the talk by Boris Renski of Mirantis especially helpful in increasing my understanding of the OpenStack ecosystem and the organizations involved in that space. The talk by Robert Hodges of Continuent on integrating MySQL and Hadoop and the talk by Nisha Talagala from Fusion-io on advances in SSD storage are also definitely worth a look.

We were fortunate to have SiliconANGLE at the conference this year, recording video interviews with a wide range of exhibitors and attendees. Whether you attended the conference or not, I think you’ll find the interviews entertaining and enlightening. You can find the videos on the Percona Live conference website or on the SiliconANGLE website or YouTube channel.

Conference Committee

Thanks go first to the nearly 130 speakers who were chosen based on over 300 submitted proposals. The Conference Committee lead by Shlomi Noach, which represented a wide array of ecosystem participants, created a solid schedule of tutorials and breakout sessions which covered a wide variety of MySQL-related topics at a variety of levels. Thanks go out to all of the Committee members:

  • Shlomi Noach, Engineer, Outbrain
  • Roland Bouman, Software Engineer, Pentaho
  • Tim Callaghan, VP of Engineering, Tokutek
  • Laine Campbell, CEO and Co-Founder, Blackbird
  • Jeremy Cole, Sr. Systems Engineer, Google
  • Todd Farmer, Director, Oracle
  • Jay Janssen, Consulting Lead, Percona
  • Giuseppe Maxia, QA Director, Continuent
  • Cedric Peintre, DBA, Dailymotion
  • Ivan Zoratti, CTO, SkySQL
  • Liz van Dijk, Head of Technical Account Management, Percona

Visit the Percona Live MySQL Conference 2014 website and click the “Session Slides” to download the slides from the sessions. Check back periodically for new sets of slides added by the confere

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